Sylvia Hall

creative/entrepreneur

how to get inspired

How To Show Appreciation Without Being A Schmoozer

employee engagement, leadership development kansas city, professional coaching, professional development training, Uncategorized, workplace training Kansas City, workshops kansas citySylvia Hall1 Comment

HowToShowAppreciationWithoutBeingASchmoozer-01First off, let me just say: I love that my work allows me to use words like 'schmoozer' in my titles. Entrepreneurship for the win! Onward… The topic of today's post comes to you from numerous conversations I've had with clients. The pressing question I want to address today is: "How can we show appreciation to the people in our lives, in a way that's genuine and effective?"

This will serve you well at work AND at home AND everywhere in between, of course.

First off, it's useful to take a step back and ask yourself: What's my EPT (Encourager Personality Type)?

(YES! I did just make up that acronym.)

But, seriously.

Do you A.) find it easy to speak encouraging words and sing the praises of the people in your life?

Or, are you B.) more reserved in your acclamations?

Or, maybe, C.) the idea of "using your words" seems too touchy feely and it makes your skin itch and your heart palpitate...?!

It's REALLY important to distinguish this.

It might be that you're already doing a great job verbalizing your appreciation. If you already "seek out the good" and are intentional about expressing your appreciation, then good for you!

On the other hand, if you are not so sure how well you convey your appreciation or if you know expressing isn't your top-strength, then keep on reading. This blog post is for you! Actually--keep reading, either way... because someone you know might resonate with this info as well!

Everyone knows that constant praise (AKA: schmoozing) loses its impact. But neglecting to offer sincere words of appreciation could lead to some serious issues.

As stated in the Forbes article "10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You" by contributor Mike Myatt, "Failing to recognize the contributions of others is not only arrogant and disingenuous, but it’s also just as good as asking them to leave."

Expressing appreciation makes people feel valued. Expressing appreciation makes people feel seen. Deep down we all crave to feel seen.

This might be a good time to remind you: what you practice is what you get good at. So, rest assured: if expressing appreciation doesn't come naturally to you, that's nothing a little practice can't fix.

It's Simple. Let's Talk Specifics
  1. Find a good time (with minimal distractions).
  2. Be SPECIFIC about a recent positive experience. You don't have to go on and on about it.
  3. Verbalize your appreciation. Share with them directly (not to someone else!) WHY their input was helpful, valuable, or appreciated.
  4. Be sure to make some eye contact.
  5. Don't pat them on the head.

That's it. Easy, peasy.

Last, and certainly not least, know this: if you struggle to recognize the good things coming from the people around you... it's highly likely you aren't recognizing the good you are doing, personally. Ask yourself: do I value and appreciate the work I am doing in the world?

I'd love to hear from you. How (or how well) do you show your appreciation to those you work or live with? Comment below and let me know!

Dear reader....I APPRECIATE You!

 

- Sylvia

The Crippling Disadvantage of a Disempowered Mindset

employee engagement, Executive Coach in Kansas City, get inspired, Kansas City Life Coach, Life Coach Kansas City, Millinneals, professional coaching, workplace training Kansas City, workshops kansas citySylvia HallComment

The Crippling Disadvantage of a Disempowered MindsetI was raking my yard yesterday (because feminism) and I have to confess: for the first patch of my raking endeavors, I had a very disempowered mindset. It was kinda funny though, because just a few weeks ago I recall raking my front yard and having a blast. A blast, you say? Really? Yes, it was a blast. Because the weather was great. Because I was ready to get out of the house and away from my laptop. Because my body craved some hard work. And because raking my yard on my own makes me feel like SheRa. Okay. I don't know much about SheRa but my friend told me about her and it sounds like she was pretty great.

Yesterday, however, I found myself in the midst of a disempowered mindset. I was way in my head with all too many thoughts (you know we have 60,000-70,000 of them per day, right?). I was feeling a bit stuck and some sort of "behind."

Well, thoughts like these love to be fondled and I knew just the thing to do. I needed to move. Again and again I forget this. A disempowered mindset is not a fate you are stuck with for a lifetime, or even for an entire day.

You can move your body to free your mind.

It didn't happen right away. The first 30 minutes? My mind was still winning .

But strenuous yard work leaves little room for thought fondling (see what I did there?!).

I chose movement to move myself out of useless mind drama.

I know, I know. Some of you are at a desk working.

And some of you are there 'till it's dark.

But there's no {good} reason you can't find a solid 10 minute to move your body in some kind of way.

You see, the crippling disadvantage of a disempowered mindset is that you aren't really living (or performing, or serving, or loving, or working) when you're stuck in your head. And that's exactly where a disempowered mindset keeps you.

There are a few great, known ways to get out of your head: Inquiry (questions). Meditation (shut it off). Movement (the brain changes when we move). It's science and stuff.

My coaching offers solutions through inquiry. But you can do the movement thing or meditation thing on your own.

truly,

-Sylvia

What We Make of Things & My New Book

creativity, employee engagement, Executive Coach, Executive Coach in Kansas City, life coach, life coach for women, Life Coach Kansas City, life coaching, Life Coaching Kansas City, mindset coaching, professional coaching, professional development training, this is real life: love notes to wake you up, workplace training Kansas City, workshops kansas citySylvia Hall1 Comment

Sylvia Hall: This Is Real Life: Love Notes To Wake You Up At the beginning of this year, I had a cancer scare. A biopsy revealed suspicious cells on and around my thyroid. And, so, it needed to be removed. It was a highly stressful time... not necessarily because of the surgery, but because of how inundated I became with anxiety. To sum it up, I was experiencing a heaping dose of vulnerability regarding my own mortality. My anxiety was compounded with guilt. Guilt that I handled it all wrong and should've handled it better. A life coach suffering from a nervous breakdown? You can file that under total ego destruction.

However, one of the most persistent thoughts that clawed at me (when considering the end of my time here on planet earth), was the book pictured above. I needed to write that book! I couldn't croak with that book still inside me! At the time of my crisis, of course, that book was just an image in my mind.

Once I got a grip on my anxiety, the first thing I did was get to work on that book. There was nothing that could stop me. Not a fear of people hating it (I am certain some will). Not a fear of mean reviews on amazon (I am sure those are coming too). And not a fear of it being a flop. How could  it flop if my entire vision of WHY I was writing it was bigger than any outside validation? I was fueled by a desire that would trump all obstacles.

I'm delighted to share with you that approximately 8 months after my surgery, my book launched. This Is Real Life: Love Notes To Wake You Up is now available for purchase on Amazon or Etsy. Both places show previews of what the book is like. If you love the previews, you'll love the book. If you don't love the previews, you won't love the book. It's as simple as that!

From my simple and formulaic story I know now more than ever the importance of what we make things mean.

So, something happens. Freak out. Figure it out. Take some action. Just keep going.

Your story can either be your catalyst for growth or it can be your excuse.

Your story can inspire you to do great things, or it can stop you in your tracks.

What we make things mean matters so very much.

What do you make it mean when it rains? What do you make it mean when you get sick? What do you make it mean when you are overwhelmed? What do you make it mean when you are bored with your life?

The wonderful thing is... no matter what you've made it mean before in your life, you can shift your perspective now. All you have to do is tell a better story.

Yours,

Sylvia